Small Business Saturday – November 24, 2012

 

Now that I have gone completely off the rails nutritionally with my FAVORITE holiday of the year, I’m going to go off the rails financially for Small Business Saturday.

For those purchasing coaching packages for themselves, take a 25% discount off of any package.  If you want to give nutrition coaching as a gift, take a 50% discount off of any package.

This is meant to be a small ‘taste’ of coaching so I am perfectly willing to have potential clients commit to only one month.  Typically, I ask that clients commit to three months in order to reap sustained benefits, but I also want people who are hesitant to give it a try!  If you are wanting a more long-term coaching relationship, I am capping the discount at a three-month commitment.

Coaching Packages

For more information and arranging purchase, contact me at visioninaction.mdf@gmail.com or 541-729-9687.

Tell your friends!

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The Ever Elusive Goal of Weight Loss

Borrowed from Lifestyle – News and Spirit

Weight loss.  It doesn’t matter where a person is, they are likely to hear some sort of message about weight loss.  Most of those messages are seriously unhealthy (i.e. weight loss “aids” and fad diets), but, in the U.S. at least, most of us do need to shed a few pounds for the sake of our overall health.  It’s not a matter of looking smokin’ hot, it’s a matter of reducing our risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and a number of other lifestyle diseases.  I, for one, see my own personal need to lose weight as a matter of doing what is best not only for myself, but for my family.  The struggle is: how does a person go about effectively setting and reaching this goal of weight loss?

At this point, I want to clarify that I am discussing weight loss for those that do not meet the medical definition for obesity (BMI of 30 or above/30+ pounds over “ideal weight”).  Those that are 30 pounds or more overweight should likely be working with medical professionals as there may be other health risks that need to managed while following a weight loss plan.

Now that we have cleared up the disclaimer, let’s talk goal setting.  The very first step is saying out loud or writing down your goal: I need to lose weight.  Once you have this, you’ll need to decide how much.  Without an actual number, your goal will likely feel impossible and never ending.  This leads to giving up.  In my case, I want to lose 20 pounds.  I don’t necessarily support putting a time line on losing weight so I won’t be saying that I need to have lost these 20 pounds by Valentine’s Day or anything like that.  This would set me up for failure, especially with my number two favorite holiday just around the corner: Turkey Day.  Instead, I know that losing 1-2 pounds a week is a healthy and sustainable weight loss goal.  I won’t do this each week because some weeks I’ll fall off the wagon for one reason or another, and water weight can fluctuate up to five pounds a day.  Remembering these things helps keep me from feeling bad about not seeing rapid, immediate progress.  In the case of weight loss, slow and steady really does win this race.

Now that I know how much weight I want to lose, I need to figure out how I’m going to do it.  This is going to be different for most people because everyone has a different relationship with food, different family food culture, and simply different lifestyles.  In my case, I already eat VERY healthy.  Not perfectly healthy, but to a degree that nutritionists would have little to suggest as far as diet change.  My problems are three-fold: portion control, no exercise outside my daily activities, and too much beer.  Now I have smaller goals to work on to get me toward my ultimate goal.  I will now be setting goals a week at a time that address my three problem areas.  So far, I have added some body weight exercises into my daily routine, cut snacking after dinner out (which leads to drastically reduced beer consumption), and I am exploring the philosophy of “mindful eating” (more on this concept at a later date.

Now, the ultimate marker of success with this goal is going to be my weight.  However, it is best to weigh one’s self only once a week and this change might not be immediate.  I know this because one pound of weight is equal to 3500 calories, meaning that I need to increase my exercise and decrease my caloric intake by a total of 500 calories per day if I am to lose one pound in a week.  This is likely to not be very easy at the beginning because I am working to change some pretty deeply ingrained habits.  How am I going to mark my success without fully relying on my weight?  Well, I am going to focus on the little things that I am doing and reward myself for doing those rather than just losing weight.  This is really about making a lifelong change and taking care of overall health, so only focusing on the number on the scale would be somewhat counter-productive.

There are many ways that a person can keep track of their goals and mark progress.  I am a pretty visual person when it comes to goal setting (I’m really big on keeping lists and marking tasks off as I go).  I was recently introduced to a FREE website, SlimKicker.  This site is really pretty fun because it turns your weight loss goals into a game format.  You can record various tasks and participate in challenges to earn points.  You set up what your reward will be as you reach new levels.  There are a few things that I don’t care for: there is no place to keep track of what my goals are and the nutrition tracking is cumbersome, but it still is an enjoyable way to work towards my overall goal.  If you are interested in trying it out and having some support, I can be found as MDFeats on the website.

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There are SO many ways to set goals and keep track of progress.  Care to share your method?

Food Is For Enjoying

Hello again everyone.  I have been silent here in the blogging world for a little while because I decided to prioritize my canning over blogging.  While I was canning and not blogging, I was also doing some thinking about the direction of my life coaching endeavors.  My business, Vision In Action, has only been open for 5 months so we are still in a growing and learning period.  I began this business because I have an incredibly strong skill set for helping others improve their lives.  I have always had a natural talent for this, but I improved upon it in college and truly honed my skills working in the social service world.  As I set out with life coaching, I thought that I would just hang my shingle out to offer my services to anyone who had any goal of any sort.  That’s a little general, don’t ya think?  I shortly received some advice from a much more experienced life coach that I should target my audience (a marketing friend of mine put it: “By trying to please everyone, you please no one.”)  It was at this point that I thought to myself, “I have worked with families with at-risk youth for 7 years, that is my niche.”  Turns out, I don’t want to do that either.  I am still very passionate about helping young people, but youth work is very intense work and I am beginning to feel that my journey in that field has concluded.  I did some amazing work, but I have skills to lend to other areas of service…and in order to offer the top-level of service, I need to be truly energized by what I am doing.

Then, one day recently, it hit me: FOOD!  I love food.  I spend the majority of my time dealing with food: growing it, tending it, preserving it, and cooking meals from scratch.  When I have conversations with friends and family, it so often turns to food and the ways that it can help us be healthier.  I am over-the-top passionate about food.  Food is what brings family and friends together to celebrate and discuss and share.  And often there is no greater kindness than giving food to someone who has none.  Food can bring people together, and tear people apart.  It can nourish your body and soul or it can irreparably damage your most vital organs.  Food is powerful.

I have also been on an incredible journey with food.  I am now at a place in my life where food is something that I use to show others that I care for them and a way I keep myself healthy.  I do have some food demons that I have struggled with and will likely struggle with my whole life.  I have suffered from anorexia and bulimia, and I have had many times where I could find nothing positive about my physical body.  This issue is so complex and my journey has been a wild one.  I do not have plans to share my entire journey with everyone, but do feel that sharing this small amount with you all can help to illustrate where my passion for food comes from.

Some might say that sharing my indecisiveness over my niche shows lack of vision or stability, but I believe it shows that I understand how goals may look black and white at the beginning, but end up neon green.  My goal has always been to use my unique skill set to help people do great things with their lives, it has just taken a bit to figure out in what way.  I want to help people stop seeing food as the enemy and to see themselves as beautiful people.  I am not setting out to help people stick to a specific diet.  I am not a weight loss guru, and will never pretend to be.  I want to inspire people to love food and be inspired by food, not to count every calorie and forget about the nutritional value that all foods have.  This is about long-term, lifestyle change, not about losing 10 pounds for your high school reunion.

I have been around a lot of food-related issues over my life and have seen people use food to improve their lives and to cope with negativity.  I know the healing power of food and have watched loved ones with cancer and multiple sclerosis use food for all of its positive benefits.  I hope that my passion about food, educational and professional background, as well as my personal journey can help you find your way to loving food and yourself.

I am interested to hear some feedback as I start re-branding my business.  I have no way of knowing if anyone is interested in this sort of service, but I have to follow my passion!  Stay-tuned for more food-related changes 🙂

Upcoming Series…Don’t Miss Out!

Hello everyone!  I am going to be writing a series of posts that deal with the Stages of Change (SOC) model in regard to making decisions about health and wellness.  I know, that sounds terribly boring and potentially painful.  Well, fear not my faithful followers!  I plan to write about this idea from the perspective a person needing to make a change and in the style of journal entries.  It should be much more entertaining than an academic examination of the SOC.

I want to do this series because making change is difficult, and it is important for those needing to make change to understand that it is a process that involves learning how to make the change, not just deciding what needs to be changed.  I am hoping that this series will help my readers understand where on the path they fall and what it is going to take to get them to move from one stage to the next.  Please leave comments, ask questions, and make suggestions throughout this series.  My character has a lot of work to do and will need support, motivation, and accountability to make it through!

I look forward to seeing how this exercise unfolds and hearing what everyone thinks.

Here’s to making healthful changes!

Patience

I plan to post just once a week, but this topic is weighing on my mind today.  Most everyone has heard the phrase, “patience is a virtue,” at some point in their life.  Some more than others if they have a particular struggle with this particular virtue.  I have heard this many times, and I think it might actually be the only virtue.  Why is it that our culture puts so much value on patience?  It seems rather odd to even ask such a question in a world filled with smart phones, diet drugs, and fast food restaurants.  However, there must be some value to patience if that colloquialism is so prevalent.

Perhaps patience is so important because we have forgotten how to be patient.  It is so easy to become aggravated when something isn’t happening as quickly or in the manner that you would like.  We’ve been conditioned to expect things yesterday and customized to our exact preference.  I find patience to be a major reoccurring theme in my life.  I become impatient with my husband, my son, and myself.  It often seems that after the moment of impatience passes, that I am able to see with clarity that events would have gone much more smoothly if I had just let things unfold as they needed to, rather than trying to bend them to my will.  Now, in general, I am a pretty easy-going individual and am able to take life as it comes, but just like many of you, when I’m in a hurry, in the middle of my own project, tired, hungry, etcetera, my easy-going nature can go on a brief vacation.

Lately, I have been reflecting on how practicing extra patience can make one’s life much more enjoyable.  It can be difficult at times, but I DO NOT enjoy being frustrated, aggravated, or angry.  Those three emotions do not bring me any closer to my goals and often set me back (granted, reacting to them in a proactive manner does help).  I am working on taking a moment to pause when I begin to feel impatience creeping into my consciousness.  In that pause I can ask myself, “What’s the rush?  Does this change in plans really matter?  Is my impatience doing harm to someone else?  What can I find to be joyful about in this moment?”

If I am a true believer that life is a journey and that true joy in life is to be found in our daily living, why be impatient?  It is the times that plans fall apart, your day gets interrupted, and the instruction booklet goes missing that we are truly living and likely making memories we will never forget.  Approaching life with the attitude that there is always knowledge to be gained or a lesson to be learned can help turn impatience into something that, at the very least, doesn’t make you want to poke your eyes out.

The Brighter Side of Dead Broccoli

Self-doubt seems to be a pretty common factor when it comes to people not living the lives they want to live.  I experience self-doubt from time-to-time.  My inner self-doubter sometimes says, “Who wants to listen to you?  You don’t have a perfect life.  You don’t have it all figured out.”  That’s when I have to stop, breathe, and remind myself of the following: no one has a perfect life, and no one has it all figured out.  Those two things are not the point of life coaching, and any life coach that portrays themselves as having it all figured out is probably a hack.  I am a normal, every day person just like everyone else.  I have goals and dreams.  I have obstacles to overcome and barriers to break down.  Some days I feel like Snow White singing while she cleans and all the woodland creatures are singing along.  Other days I am more like Ursula from The Little Mermaid when she puffs up really big and destroys everything in the sea.

A life coach must be committed to constantly building a better life for themselves as well as helping others to do so.  The tag line I have chosen for my business, Vision In Action, is: Co-creating the life you desire.  I was asked once if I am living the life I desire and I ecstatically responded, “Yes!”  Later in the day, I started to wonder if that were true.  After some thinking, I reminded myself that I was being ridiculous; of course its true.  I am living the life I desire, but there are aspects of it that I am always working to improve.  For instance, I envision having a year-round garden that literally pukes vegetables at my family.  Well, some years all of my broccoli dies and the slugs eat my cabbage.  My husband and I are constantly working together to find ways to improve the garden next year.  There are many missteps, but each trial brings us closer to our goal of year-round, homegrown nutrition.

Long story short, I did not begin life coaching because I believe that I am better at life than other people.  I began life coaching because I am skilled at helping others work through all the crap, that I have first-hand knowledge, life can throw at us.