How to Cure The Hiccups

I made it to yoga class today.  After a hiccup on Monday, it was nice to have everything fall into place and wake up my sleeping body.  I haven’t done any yoga in over a year, but it is just like riding a bicycle: once you are standing on that yoga mat, your muscles know what to do!  The instructor added a couple new poses to the flow and they were completely new to me.  At the end, she suggested taking home the ideas of flexibility and trying new things also mentioning how the two go together.  That got the gears turning in my head and connected up with my planned topic of “set-backs.”

Whenever there is a goal to be reached, the generally accepted practice is to make a plan to reach said goal.  For every long-term goal there are short-term goals and smaller steps that are part of the short-term goals.  The idea is that by mapping out all of these steps, a plan will be born that can be followed as a road map to the overall goal.  This is absolutely the way to go, but we so often forget that a lot can happen between Point A and Point B.  There are a lot of ways to describe what might happen on the journey (I used the term “hiccup” at the beginning of this post), but I’m going to use the term “set-back.”  Typically, if your work toward your goal does not go quite to plan, it is because something has gone awry.  We don’t dwell on occurrences outside of our plan that had a positive effect, but rather on those that slow us down or send us backwards.  We can choose to view set-backs in one of three ways: (1) negative (2) positive or (3) neutral.  It is VERY easy to go the negative route and become frustrated and discouraged.  It is more difficult to view them as neutral and just let the set-back go and move on.  It can be tough to turn the set-back into something positive, but this is where a person is going to experience the most growth and reap the most reward.

I have said this before: life is about enjoying the day-to-day experience of being alive.  This can be extremely difficult when faced with tragic or sad events, but there is always something to be learned.  If we never experience set-backs, we would never grow emotionally, socially, intellectually or culturally.  Set-backs often force us to be flexible and provide opportunities for us to try something that we never have or hadn’t thought of in the first place.  Set-backs also provide an excellent opportunity for you to reach out to your support system and seek out new ideas.  I experience set-backs on a fairly regular basis as a parent of a toddler, and this calls for much flexibility in my approach and a lot of calling on others for ideas.

I would like to call upon my readers to stop thinking of set-backs as simply negative experiences that make reaching a goal difficult.  Let’s begin thinking of set-backs as reminders: reminders that flexibility and openness can lead to creative new solutions.

Have any of you experienced a “reminder” that lead to something unexpected?

 

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